Monday, April 15, 2013

Math activities with Money

Playing with money can be really fun as a kid (and maybe as an adult too).  I find that many kids find it difficult to make change with money, though.  I am trying to get some children's book published that involve playing with money.  If you need to print out some play money, you can print my 'menu money' here.

Here are some activities you can do with your student.

  • Have a child add up three different priced items (total under $20).  Have them find change (from a $20 bill).
  • Play with fake money (add, subtract, multiply, and divide).
    • Add up an order at the grocery store, divide to find the average per household member.
    • At a restaurant multiply and see how much the total would be if everyone ordered the same thing.
    • For any of these situations, given the play money, have them make change from a larger paid amount (If the total is $8.75, how much would you get back if you gave them $20--and to be more difficult--how much would you get back if you gave them $20.25?)
  • Get to know what currency is in your area--US $, CAN $, Euros, etc. and practice using them.
  • Play with a budget.  Have the kids plan meals with only a certain amount of money for a few days--can they stay within the budget?
Are there there any other denominations of 'menu money' you want to see?  .01 or .50? Maybe a 50 or 100?

5 comments:

  1. I do love these exercises, Lucy. Love that your blog is growing day by day:)

    Nutschell
    www.thewritingnut.com

    ReplyDelete
  2. Hey Lucy!
    I used your coat hanger activity for homework and I've already had a kid who normally HATES maths say "your much better at giving us homework lately, it's way funner" haha!

    x Serena x
    Magic Mistakes & Mayhem

    ReplyDelete
  3. Money is one great way for kids to learn decimals and fractions too. Our Malaysian Ringgit does not have quarters, but we have 50 sen, so this is our half Ringgit. And the 5, 10, 20 sens too. My son likes to add his spending at the grocery in his head, a really good way to practice addition without using a calculator. A good one, Lucy.

    ReplyDelete
  4. One that has always worked with my kids is "If you can figure out how much it costs, you can buy it."

    ReplyDelete
  5. My wife likes to practice subtraction with our money.

    Lee
    An A to Z Co-Host
    Tossing It Out

    ReplyDelete

Thanks SO much for stopping by! I appreciate your comments and any ideas you share! Have a wonderful day : )

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